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  • June 24

    Matt Bomer talks “The Last Tycoon” with OUT

    Written by Luciana

    In another interview released today, Matt talked to OUT about straight roles, pride, & the greatness of Montgomery Clift.

    The show displays a dark side of Hollywood. Is this a realistic view or is it more cynical?

    I think Fitzgerald was never appreciated in his time the way we appreciate him now and I think his experience in Hollywood as a writer was probably a frustrating one in some regards. I don’t feel that. I feel it’s more realism, to be honest with you, and what’s shocking to me is how little has changed in some regards. What goes into the decision to cast a certain person or to make a certain movie or not make a certain movie because of what’s going on in society or politics and which markets you need to appeal to, those things are really relevant even today. I’ve seen them. I’ve been blessed by them and I’ve been a victim of them. To me, I don’t think it’s cynical. At the end of the day it’s called show business and people are going to look after that bottom line to cover their ass.

    I feel like you’re casting a new mold as a leading man: you’re out and this is a straight role. How do you feel about that?

    Look, first of all, I’m so grateful and inspired by people like Billy Ray and Amazon and Sony who are willing to choose the person they feel best suits the role regardless of what their personal life might be. They choose the artist they want to work with and those are the kinds of people in the business that I want to work with.

    I try not to think about it, but you can’t help to not consider it and you can’t help but have it in the back of your head. For me, I tend to be so hard on myself as it is I put so much pressure on myself because I’m always thinking about the next generation and doing a job that will be suitable enough to make sure I’m not the last person who gets this great benefit of the times that we’re living in. Part of my job is just letting go of that and just focusing on the work and doing the best I can and not thinking of myself as anything different or other, just thinking of myself as an actor doing my job.

    Last week on James Corden, you told a story about your son. Maybe it was because of Orlando, but I couldn’t help thinking how it’s as important as ever that LGBTQ+ people stay visible, even with a simple anecdote like that.

    I just try to treat it as my life and my experience. I know James on a friendly basis. It’s never really been a special or delicate thing to talk about. He has kids so we talk about our lives when I see him and I think in terms of being who you are, it’s obviously a highly subjective matter. A lot of times people want other people to be out and marching in the parade, but sometimes there are things going on in people’s personal lives or interpersonal relationships with their immediate family that make those things very difficult. I think it is important to live your truth but it’s not my place to judge anybody for where they are in terms of finding that truth.

    To read the full interview, go to OUT website.

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