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  • June 27

    Matt Bomer on Playing a Gay Superhero

    Written by Jasper

    As part of their Rainbow Crew interview series, Matt spoke with Digital Spy to discuss his heroic role in Doom Patrol. The first three episodes of the new season are available to stream now on HBO Max!

    Matt Bomer wasn’t planning to star in a superhero show. He had just finished up Boys in the Band on Broadway when DC approached him for the role of Larry Trainor. As Bomer puts it, “Doom Patrol came out of left field,” and that’s rather fitting given how wild this show actually is.

    Based on comics first written in 1963, the “World’s Strangest Heroes” are misfits in every sense of the word. Not only do their bizarre powers alienate them from the world at large, but the Doom Patrol franchise has always been an outlier too, often sidelined in favour of more ‘appealing’ outsiders like the X-Men.

    That’s starting to change now though thanks to the Doom Patrol TV show. Inspired by Grant Morrison’s relentlessly weird run from the late eighties, this new adaptation subverts superhero tropes by incorporating Dadaist elements of abstract surrealism… and that’s exactly what appealed to Bomer in the first place.

    “I think we’re living in an era of episodics where, you know, the more unique, the better! There’s so much content out there. So, I hope the show continues to get weirder and weirder.”

    Given what we’ve seen of season two so far, it’s safe to say that Bomer’s got his wish. Following on from all those carnivorous butts and the cockroach kisses of season one, new episodes include a super-powered ape-faced girl and Doctor Tyme, a disco-loving time traveller who wears a clock for a head.

    That’s a lot to absorb for even diehard comic-book fans, but as Bomer points out, these “bizarre, offbeat” stories are actually grounded in something far more universal:

    “As much as it’s a fun superhero show, Doom Patrol is really about the human condition, and the capacity for even the most marginalised amongst us to find our inner hero.”

    Watching Robotman contend with his shitty past or Rita struggle with her self-worth, it’s clear that each member of the team is deeply flawed in some way, much like we all are, and it’s this trauma which grounds Doom Patrol, transforming it into something truly special.

    You can read the full interview at Digital Spy!


    June 25

    Matt Bomer on Bringing Queer Representation to Prestige Superhero TV

    Written by Jasper

    In light of the premiere of Doom Patrol, Matt spoke with ET Online to discuss the new season and bringing Larry Trainor to life.

    Known for his breakout role in White Collar, his Golden Globe–winning turn in The Normal Heart as well as the Magic Mike films, Matt Bomer is the first to admit that doing a superhero series wasn’t at the top of the list of what he wanted to do next in his career. But when it comes to Doom Patrol, the trippy DC Universe series returning for season 2 on HBO Max, he found himself attracted to the pathos imbued in the storytelling. “What I love about this show is that as much as it is prestige superhero television, it’s really about the human condition and the capacity for even the most marginalized among us to find their inner hero,” he tells ET.

    On the series, which was adapted for the screen by executive producer Jeremy Carver along with superhero savant Greg Berlanti, Bomer plays Larry Trainor, whom he describes as “one part Montgomery Clift, one part elephant man.” A closeted Air Force pilot who’s badly burned in a plane crash after he makes contact with a negative spirit, Trainor has managed to survive decades later thanks to the special bandages covering his body that prevent the spread of radioactivity emitting from his body. 

    Over the course of season 1, Trainor is haunted by his past as he tries to come to terms with his sexuality and relationship with fellow pilot John Bowers (Kyle Clements), whom he pushed away after the accident and never fully got over. 

    “I love working on Larry because it never felt — other than some of the bigger-budget action sequences or special effects sequences — it never felt like I was working on a superhero show,” Bomer says. “There was so much pathos and character-driven drama in those scenes that it felt like I was just getting to work on a really great well-written show. Especially those scenes with John.”

    The scenes the actor is referring to include some of the flashbacks with Trainor and Bowers in a motel room and later at a gay bar, where they both get to be themselves, even as Trainor is trying to figure out how to be completely comfortable in his own skin. 

    “Season 1 was so much about self-discovery and being able to finally come to terms with his own authenticity after 60 years of basically shutting down and diving into his past, and going from a man who had thought that he had to, in order to achieve what he wanted, cut off the most authentic part of himself,” Bomer says, explaining that journey then allowed Trainor to “ultimately find love and acceptance for himself and be able to come out to his crew.”

    Read the full interview at ET Online!


    June 25

    Matt Bomer on How ‘The Sinner’ Made Him into a Better Actor

    Written by Jasper

    Last April, Matt talked with Backstage magazine through a short Instagram live and discussed The Sinner and the discoveries he made through portraying the character of Jamie Burns. This interview is also featured in the June 25th issue of the magazine, you can view the scan in our gallery!


    June 17

    Matt Bomer in ‘Live with Kelly and Ryan’

    Written by Jasper

    As previously announced, Matt appeared via video chat on Live with Kelly and Ryan to discuss the new season of Doom Patrol. He also admitted that this was his first time attending a talk show in socks! Check out two clips from the interview below.


    June 16

    EW’s ‘Untold Stories: Pride Edition’ Podcast

    Written by Jasper

    In celebration of Pride Month, Entertainment Weekly is doing a special four-episode podcast series, Untold Stories: Pride Edition, hosted by Tre’vell Anderson. Matt is part of the first episode wherein he gives a moving tribute to the late Larry Kramer. You can listen to the full podcast episode below. Matt’s part begins around the 38:30 mark.


    May 28

    Matt Bomer Pays Tribute to Larry Kramer

    Written by Jasper

    Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, has died on Wednesday morning due to pneumonia. He was notably hailed for his autobiographical play, The Normal Heart, which had an HBO adaptation in 2014 starring Matt Bomer and Mark Ruffalo. Matt has paid tribute to Larry on his Instagram account. He also spoke with Marc Malkin from Variety, and referred to Mr. Kramer as “one of the most courageous people I’ve ever known.”

    Matt Bomer’s career took a major upswing in 2015 when he won a Golden Globe for his performance as Felix in Ryan Murphy’s HBO adaptation of Larry Kramer’s “The Normal Heart.”

    “Larry Kramer, thank you for your anger and your passion and writing this story that changed so many lives,” the actor said in his acceptance speech.

    Today, Bomer is remembering the late writer and AIDS activist as one of his heroes. “I, and countless others, owe our lives to Larry,” Bomer told Variety. “Without his tireless advocacy and his outspokenness and opposition to everything that was going on and encouraging people to educate themselves and be responsible for themselves, I, growing up in a semi-rural environment, wouldn’t have had any clue about the epidemic if it weren’t for him.”

    Bomer said he first read Kramer’s writings when he was 14 or 15. “For me, it was the first time that someone really stood up and said, ‘You should be proud of who you are and you should be outspoken about who you are and you should be bold about who you are and passionate about who you are.’ He  was a trailblazer and one of the most courageous people I’ve ever known.”

    You can read the full interview at Variety.


    May 27

    Interview: Matt Bomer Talks ‘The Sinner’ with Gold Derby

    Written by Jasper

    Matt had a video chat with Gold Derby editor Rob Licuria to discuss the third season of The Sinner. You can watch the full interview below!


    June 24

    “The Boys in the Band” Visits SiriusXM’s Town Hall

    Written by Luciana

    The cast of The Boys in the Band answered questions from audience members as they appear on the SiriusXM’s Town Hall hosted by Andy Cohen on June 14 at the SiriusXM Studios in New York City.

    Cast members Andrew Rannells, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer, Jim Parsons, Robin de Jesus, Brian Hutchinson, Charlie Carver, Michael Benjamin Washington, and Tuc Watkins woke up early to attend the interview to promote their hit play.

    Some videos were released at the official youtube channel, but sadly none with questions addressed to Matt. You can also check in our gallery HQ images that has been added.




    June 24

    Matt Plays ‘Charades’ on Jimmy Fallon

    Written by Luciana

    Matt was guest on Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon in May, and he took part of one of most popular Jimmy Fallon’s competitive games, The Charades. Watch it:


    October 06

    Matt Bomer on Man Against Nature in Walking Out and His New Job

    Written by Luciana

    Parade magazine has published a new interview with Matt, in order of the Walking Out release today.

    Read it below, and also check additional stills and posters from the movie in our gallery.

    With your background, how did you prepare for this man-against-nature role?

    I love the outdoors and I love Montana, so I went up early with Alex Smith, one of the twin brother directors of the film, and we did some outdoor activities with some real Montanans. People who were living the life or a reasonable facsimile of the life that Cal lived. So we fished, I went on a hunting trip with them and we talked. I tried to get inside their heads a little bit.

    Other than that, it was really an experiential shoot. This was something that everyone did for the love of the piece. There were no trailers; there were no cast chairs. You came in, you got ready, and you stood in the snow on the mountain in Montana in between takes while the snow fell.

    What was it like to work in all that snow?

    I really liked it. I was really grateful that I was healthy. I didn’t want to get sick on such a short shoot but we had great set costumers taking care of us with heating pads strapped to our bodies when it got really cold. The rest of the time, you wanted it to be in that immersive experience. You want to be that cold. It is one less thing you have to think about as an actor in a scene where the character is experiencing a similar circumstance.

    The activity in the film is this father/son hunting trip, so it seems to be more about forging a father/son bond or maybe connecting in general, putting down your phone and having human connections than actually hunting.

    Yes, it is absolutely about connections. Both the characters in the film have preconceived notions of how they are going to connect. David is more reticent about it but Cal really feels that he has to instill these values and principles in his son; he has to pass them on. What they realize during the course of the film is that a lot of real bonding happens under the most dire circumstances. When everything you presuppose and everything you try to project on an event goes out the window, you really are left with your most raw self.

    As a father of three, what did you take away from this particular relationship between father and son?

    I drew from my father a lot for this in an interesting way, particularly because our sons are a bit younger than David’s character in the film. So a lot of it was what I drew from my relationship from my father. I think what I took from it was Josh Wiggins is one of my favorite people I have ever worked with. We had a blast together.

    My favorite nature scene is when the deer comes up to Cal. That really got me.

    That was just one of those magic moments that you pray for and you hope that the gods come through. We were out on this property and they said, “We have this tame deer. She is very curious. She may or may not come up to you.” So, I had to sit at the bottom of this tree while they rolled the cameras and hope that this deer would approach me. For whatever reason, miraculously, she did. That was the take we got. It was a really spiritual experience. It was towards the end of the shoot and I had a pretty good experience of what my character was and you hope that you can avail yourself in that moment.

    It was sad that The Last Tycoon was canceled but it actually ended in a good place.

    It had always been a dream to do a [F. Scott] Fitzgerald piece and the fact that I got to do it with a bucket list of professionals that I always wanted to work with across the board — behind the camera and in front of the camera; above the line, below the line — so I am incredibly grateful for that experience. The fact that we had nine hours of Fitzgerald, how many people can say that they did that?

    How have you been preparing for your directorial debut?

    I am in my directing office right now and I am going to start tomorrow. I poured over thousands of pages of books, I shadowed some really talented, generous, wonderful directors, and I am in the world of Ryan Murphy, so you have some of the most incredible professionals you could have working with you. I am excited and terrified and I haven’t really been this thrilled about anything in this industry for awhile, so it’s been a great way to shake up my creative spirit.

    I’ve heard that Ryan is good about giving opportunities to first-time directors. How did it come about that this was yours?

    He is just one of those people who is so generous of spirit. Truly. I think he knew I had been in this medium of episodic for 20 years, and he knew that I really extensively prepare for everything that I do, and for whatever reason, he saw qualities in me that he felt would work well as an episodic director.

    He called me out of the blue and said, “What do you think about directing it?” I was flabbergasted and blown away and I just very humbly said, “I can’t thank you enough. I will do my best to be prepared and come through. Obviously, he’s been a very big influence in my life and, in large part, he’s been an architect of my career in many ways.

    What about the murder of Gianni Versace will make people want to watch?

    There is so much I didn’t know. There are so many reasons people are going to watch. There are so many incredible performances going on and the writing is unparalleled. But there is so much about the story that I didn’t understand the specifics of it in the larger context of what was going on in the time period. I am excited for people to see it.

    It also has sex, money and fashion.

    All the things that excites and titillates but it also has some real substance and nuance to it that will keep people coming back for more.

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