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Interviews

Matt Bomer on Late Night With Seth Meyers

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Matt was interviewed last night on Late Night with Seth Meyers, to promote Magic Mike XXL. Earlier, he was at SiriusXM Studios, for another row of interviews. You can watch a excerpt of the interview to Seth Meyers below, and in our gallery there’s HQ promotional stills of the show.

Matt Bomer: ‘It Was Great to Share’ Emmy Nomination News With Husband Simon

After dropping upwards of 40 pounds for his role in “The Normal Heart,” it’s all about love and family right now for Matt Bomer.

Bomer, 36, was “blown away and just so grateful” when his name was announced today as an Emmy Award nominee for best supporting actor for his portrayal of Felix in the HBO adaptation of Larry Kramer’s 1985 play about the onset of the HIV-AIDS crisis among the gay population in New York City.

After the “White Collar” star dropped to an astonishing 130 pounds for the role to show how the disease can ravage the human body — which meant shedding the chiseled features he usually shows off in his hit TV show or movies like “Magic Mike.”

Even though it was a long, difficult road to this apex point — Bomer said all the hard work culminated in one call this morning from his husband Simon Halls.

“I’m in New York and was getting ready to go to work on ‘White Collar.’ I got a phone call from my husband and he shared the news with me,” Bomer said. “It was so great to get to share that moment with him, because I had to separate myself from my family for a while to play this role. I’m sure when I was 130 pounds, I wasn’t always in the best mood, so it was nice to get to share a happy moment with him.”

At first, Bomer admitted he couldn’t even grasp the gravity of an Emmy nomination.

“I couldn’t even speak for the first minute,” he said. “I was overcome with gratitude, just the moment was so profound for me. I’ve been working in TV for 13 years and to have this moment, I was completely overwhelmed and had to collect myself for a bit. Simon knew firsthand how hard I worked on this role, how much we put into it, myself as an actor, and us collectively as a family. it was just really great to get to share that moment with him.”

You can read the entire article here.

Matt Bomer won’t let go of HBO ‘Normal Heart’ role

How did you build your onscreen chemistry with Ruffalo?

We were fortunate enough to film things mostly sequentially for the first half of the film, so we stayed in character together on set. Without sounding overly Methody about the whole thing, we just related to each other as Ned and Felix. If it was a scene where we had to be really tender with each other, we would sit together in closer proximity than actors might normally do and tell each other personal stories, so that when the cameras were rolling, we didn’t suddenly have to affect something. It was coming from a place that we had already created.

This is such an emotional role for you. Was it difficult to leave Felix behind at the end of each day?

I don’t want to let go of Felix. Usually by the time I’m done [with a role], I’m like, “OK, let’s close that chapter and move on,” but I don’t want to let go of him because I think he changed me for the better. I grew from getting to play him. What I love about their relationship is it is so symbiotic, because Felix is having trouble with his authenticity but is also incredibly available to intimacy and a real relationship. And Ned is this firebrand who’s completely authentic, and comfortable with who he is, but is terrified of intimacy. Together they help heal each other.

There was a moment when Mark and I — after we finished the wedding scene, which I think was the last thing we filmed together — just held on to each other and sobbed for a good 15 minutes. Not because of anything we had done but because we were a part of this story that was so much bigger than us, and because we knew that this was how a generation of people had to say goodbye to each other. Taking in the gravity of that moment was really overwhelming. It was just one of those things you don’t ever forget.

You can read the rest of the interview here.

Matt Bomer talks his 40-pound weight loss for “The Normal Heart”

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Did they track you down for this role, or did you push for it?

I think it was probably both. Probably more so on my side. I just felt that it was a story I had been familiar with for so long that I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to at least try to be a part of it.

You were very young during the ’80s, and you were a long ways away from the center of this story in New York. Were you aware of the story in the ’80s? Did you see it on TV? And now as you see it from your perspective, now when you play this character, what does it feel like?

This play was actually the first exposure I really had, a real understanding of the illness. I read it in the closet of my drama room when I was 14 years old, and the irony of that is not lost on me.

So, you know, I grew up in the Bible Belt, and there was no talk about [HIV]. I remember reading this play and seeing this neon blinking SOS and being terrified but also glad that I had some kind of understanding of what was going on, and I did lose friends. I started working at the theater in Art Town in the mid-’90s, which was in some ways an especially difficult time in the epidemic, and that was my first direct contact in losing friends and things like that. So I guess this story, for me, was always the genesis of my understanding of what the disease was.

How many conversations did you have with Larry about playing Felix?

First of all, I love Larry. We spent a good deal of time together talking about the world. He has done revivals of this play for so long, I didn’t want to keep rehashing tough territory for him. So much of this story really is in the text. The most important thing that he told me was it is more about who this individual was before he got sick and after. And the good and the bad with both of those sides of the coin.

You can read the entire interview here.

Matt Bomer Tells the Personal Story Behind His Heartbreaking ‘Normal Heart’ Performance

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Let’s start with the premiere. Larry Kramer was there. So many New York men who remember that time were there. I heard the sobbing was audible. What was it like to watch The Normal Heart on screen in a room full of those people?

Most importantly, getting to watch the standing ovation for Larry Kramer and to see him taking in a moment that was 30 years in the making was something I’ll never forget. For me, that was just one of those really rarified experiences that you’re very lucky if you get maybe once in a career as an artist.

But also, this is such a distinct part of New York history, this play, and I’m so thankful to HBO that they gave it such a grand opening there in New York. And paid homage and respect to this generation of people. Afterwards at the after-party, so many people who approached me wanted to tell me stories of people they lost and their experiences during that dark time in our history. They just wanted to cry and share their feelings with me. It was unforgettable. I became an actor because I read playwrights like Larry and Tony Kushner, and wanted to be a part of telling stories that hopefully have significance or can educate people or challenge their points of view or change their worldview the way these playwrights did for me. So to actually be a part of something like that as a grown-up, it’s like, man, you just check your ego at the door and try to serve the story.

There’s a headline that keeps circulating from a quote that you gave, where you said, “Larry Kramer probably saved my life.”

Yeah. I’m sure he did. At the time I first read it, my first sexual relationships were with women. But even then he put the fear of God in me! (Laughs) He educated me in a lot of ways. It was a very useful fear. But it was also the education to be smart and be safe, and that carried over into my later relationships and also when I started to have relationships with men.

But I think he saved me on a more profound than practical level. Even at 14 when I still didn’t know who I was when I read this piece—I was still figuring out who my most authentic self was—to have this voice that was such a firebrand and so honest and so authentic, to know that that reality was out there, even though it was nowhere near my immediate experience in suburban Texas, to know that somewhere it was out there gave me a sense of hope. And I think I knew on some level that a part of me that hadn’t been acknowledged yet was going to be OK.

You can read the entire interview here.