Source: MSN
Date: June 23, 2010

A couple weeks back, we took you insider the super-advanced sneak-preview of “White Collar”‘s Season 2 premiere, as part of our trip to the USA smash-hit’s Queens, NY set. But in case waiting until that fateful July 13 evening doesn’t satisfy your “White”-hot anticipation for the stylish drama, here’s a taste of the intimate Q & A star Matthew Bomer (aka charismatic convict-come-FBI consultant Neal Caffrey) conducted that afternoon, fresh off shooting scenes just down the corridor. And remember to keep it locked here to TV Buzz for continued “White Collar” coverage and exclusive insights.

MATTHEW BOMER ON NEAL AND KATE’S RELATIONSHIP: “What I always loved about the character is that his romantic life is where he got sloppy. It’s sort of his tragic flaw, Achilles heel. So, I truly believe Neal is a little bit obsessive-compulsive in a lot of ways. I think that’s one of the benefits and probably drawbacks of being as intelligent as he is. But yeah, [Kate] was definitely an obsession, but I think in his heart he truly believed that she was the one for him.”

MATTHEW BOMER ON NEAL REMAINING TRUSTWORTHY: “It’s always been my hope for the character that he’d never just jump over to the other side of the moral spectrum. I hope he always stays in the gray area and loves it and enjoys it and he’s always testing his boundaries with Peter. But yeah, trust is really one of, if not the central theme of the show. It plays into every scene in all of the different characters… so it’s something that sort of shows its face a lot on the show in all the different relationships, and I hope it continues to be a central theme.”

MATTHEW BOMER ON HE AND NEAL’S SIMILARITIES: “Well, one of the real bonuses we have this season is that I now have an advisor, a con artist who advises me on set on a lot of things. So, I am getting a little bit more confident with my pick-pocketing skills, and I can actually pick a lock now. So, watch out. But as far as breaking into a bank, I’m not going to try to go there, because the main difference between me and Neal Caffrey is my ass will get caught.”

MATTHEW BOMER ON WHETHER HE’S TOO ATTRACTIVE: “You all need to come in here and see me before I go through hair and makeup, and then we can revisit this conversation. That’s sort of an impossible question to answer. [I’m an] a**hole on either front or completely fake. I don’t think about it. I mean, I think as human beings we have a tendency to see some of our drawbacks more than we see our benefits. So I’ve never really thought of myself as anything special in that regard. So, thank you for that question. It’s brightening my day a little bit, but I don’t really know how to answer it.”

MATTHEW BOMER ON HOW THE SHOW HAS IMPROVED HIS ART HISTORY: “If I had to sculpt the things that it looks like Neal sculpted on there, we’d be in real trouble. It’d be like an episode of ‘Sesame Street.’… We have people who are very skilled usually, with whatever slight of hand or trickery I’m doing or sculpting or artistic endeavor. And I always try to get to set a little bit early that day and figure out, you know, okay, well, show me what your technique is like when you are sculpting or when you’re brushing, or what part of the painting would you be working on right now? Or if we’re in the finishing stages of this sculpture, what tool would you be using, and how would you be using it?”

MATTHEW BOMER ON THE SHOW TAKING PLACE OUTSIDE NEW YORK: “No, I don’t think it could take place anywhere else. I think New York is really a central character in the show. And what I love about the show is, You see a lot of programs that shoot here, and they look down on the city and at the sort of dirty, grimy corners of SVU. I don‘t want to name any specific shows, but you know, they position New York as a very gritty place, and what I love about our show is that it looks up on New York and you see the tops of buildings. You see the big buildings in the background and it’s a very optimistic sort of blue skies version of New York City…. I mean, my god, if we shot that in like, you know, somewhere in Middle America, people would be like, ‘Well, you look like a clown.’ But for some reason, in New York when you’re walking down the street where everybody’ there to make a statement, it works.”