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Interview

‘Walking Out’ Cast Interview for The Hollywood Reporter

Matt, Bill Pullman, Josh Wiggins, and directors Alex and Andrew Smith also sat with The Hollywood Reporter to chat about Walking Out yesterday (21) in Sundance. Watch the video below, and screen captures in our gallery.

Matt at “Lunch with Bruce”

Matt visited yesterday Lunch with Bruce, at SiriusMX radio. The program aired today, and he said he was celibate on college.

“It’s so sad. I wish I had that time back. Don’t be celibate in college, man,” he told Bruce Bozzi, laughing. “Well see, my freshman year I was still dating girls, so I had some sexual relationships going on there, but then I cut it off at a certain point. I was like, eh, now I’m going to focus on the craft, figure this out, not hurt anybody and get my s*** together, basically.”

Matt also discussed a more serious topic: realizing his truth as a gay man.

“I was working at the Utah Shakespeare Festival after my sophomore year of college, and we had a hair and makeup artist who was a transgender girl and did the entire company’s hair and makeup. Her name is Kennedy,” he said. “She did shows when she was very dolled up, but in her day-to-day life she lived very simply, and she was raised in a Mormon family, which was very conservative.”

Our friend Alejandra recorded the show, and you can listen it below:

Why The Last Tycoon Is the Best Vision of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Unfinished Work

Esquire has published a great interview with Matt, to promote The Last Tycoon. They’re also – in a huge agreement with the fanbase – talking about how Bomer is made for this role – “Though he’s still getting caught up on his old Hollywood history, Bomer is as debonair and tortured as the role requires“. Yeah, we all agree!

Check some excerpts of the great interview below:

So how did you get involved with The Last Tycoon, and what drew you to it?
Billy called me out of the blue in December. He brought the project up to me, and his vision for it. Like all of us, I was very familiar with Fitzgerald’s work, but it had been a while since I had read The Last Tycoon or seen the Kazan film. It sounded like the world he wanted to create, while a period piece, was very topical and interesting. I read the script, I thought it was fantastic, we sat down together, and that was that.

Now you’ve played your fair share of rogues. You got famous playing a con man. Is it more fun to be a bit evil, or more pure good?
You know, I try not to think of it as black and white, because all human beings have a shadow. We all have a great deal of admirable qualities, and we all have some that could probably be improved upon. My favorite characters, when I read them, are people with some aspects of both—that feels more human and [like] the people I’ve encountered and my own experiences of life. I like it when they have a little bit of each.

Now you filmed the pilot, and Amazon is waiting around to see what the reaction is, and then it will decide whether to order it to series or not, right?
Yeah. That’s the plan.

How are you feeling? Is this a nerve-wracking way to work? Because all you can do is get the word out and hope people see it and like it.
You know, I try not to worry about it too much. Thankfully, I have a very full life. I’m married with kids, so I have a lot of things to focus on, other projects either in post-production or pre-production, so you just do the best you can. I love that Amazon has this diplomatic process where people’s voices can be heard, and they can weigh in. I think it’s a great way to use the interconnectedness we have with the Internet. At the same time, pilots are essentially rough drafts. It’s a bit like bringing all your friends into an ultrasound and saying, “Isn’t my baby beautiful?” You can make out the rough outlines and the edges and get a good sense of what the baby is going to look like, but you won’t know until you get a chance to flesh it out. I just hope people will visit the world and enjoy what they see. For me personally, I look at it and go, “Oh that’s great, that’s cool, that did not work, I can work on that,” and you soldier forward should you be given the opportunity.

Are you resisting the urge to check in with your agent or whomever every day and go, “Okay, what are the numbers now? How about now?”
You know, I think for the first couple of days I did, and then I realized that’s just not a healthy endeavor. There’s an old saying: “There’s no sure formula for success, but the only certain formula for failure is to try to please everybody.” I think if you over-concern yourself with what people’s opinions are, I don’t think it’s really healthy for anybody. And certainly as an artist, you don’t want those voices in your head when you’re trying to make a choice for a character. You want to be operating from where you are in that space with the work you’ve done.

I don’t know if this is true or not, but there’s a long-running rumor that if you work with George Clooney and get to know him even a little, he will send you a box of what he considers the 100 best movies of all time, and he expects you to watch them all.
I can imagine no more enjoyable assignment from a director. I would love that. As a matter of fact, if George Clooney ever reads this, I want those 100 movies regardless of whether or not we work together.

Read the full interview at Esquire website.

Matt Bomer talks “The Last Tycoon” with OUT

In another interview released today, Matt talked to OUT about straight roles, pride, & the greatness of Montgomery Clift.

The show displays a dark side of Hollywood. Is this a realistic view or is it more cynical?

I think Fitzgerald was never appreciated in his time the way we appreciate him now and I think his experience in Hollywood as a writer was probably a frustrating one in some regards. I don’t feel that. I feel it’s more realism, to be honest with you, and what’s shocking to me is how little has changed in some regards. What goes into the decision to cast a certain person or to make a certain movie or not make a certain movie because of what’s going on in society or politics and which markets you need to appeal to, those things are really relevant even today. I’ve seen them. I’ve been blessed by them and I’ve been a victim of them. To me, I don’t think it’s cynical. At the end of the day it’s called show business and people are going to look after that bottom line to cover their ass.

I feel like you’re casting a new mold as a leading man: you’re out and this is a straight role. How do you feel about that?

Look, first of all, I’m so grateful and inspired by people like Billy Ray and Amazon and Sony who are willing to choose the person they feel best suits the role regardless of what their personal life might be. They choose the artist they want to work with and those are the kinds of people in the business that I want to work with.

I try not to think about it, but you can’t help to not consider it and you can’t help but have it in the back of your head. For me, I tend to be so hard on myself as it is I put so much pressure on myself because I’m always thinking about the next generation and doing a job that will be suitable enough to make sure I’m not the last person who gets this great benefit of the times that we’re living in. Part of my job is just letting go of that and just focusing on the work and doing the best I can and not thinking of myself as anything different or other, just thinking of myself as an actor doing my job.

Last week on James Corden, you told a story about your son. Maybe it was because of Orlando, but I couldn’t help thinking how it’s as important as ever that LGBTQ+ people stay visible, even with a simple anecdote like that.

I just try to treat it as my life and my experience. I know James on a friendly basis. It’s never really been a special or delicate thing to talk about. He has kids so we talk about our lives when I see him and I think in terms of being who you are, it’s obviously a highly subjective matter. A lot of times people want other people to be out and marching in the parade, but sometimes there are things going on in people’s personal lives or interpersonal relationships with their immediate family that make those things very difficult. I think it is important to live your truth but it’s not my place to judge anybody for where they are in terms of finding that truth.

To read the full interview, go to OUT website.

Can You Beat Matt Bomer At A 1930s Slang Quiz?

A few days ago Buzzfeed published a Snapchat with Matt on their studios, and we was waiting for more videos and pictures. Today it was released a sort of a quizz on their website, alongside this cute video.

Also, pictures of the photoshoot he took that day is now in our gallery.

“The Nice Guys” Promo Tour in London

Matt is currently in London as part of The Nice Guys promotion tour. Last night he attended a special screening at the Empire Leicester Square.

(View another picture here and a small video here)

Earlier today, he did an interview to a local radio station, and posted about it on his twitter.

Later he, Russell Crowe, Shane Black and Joel Silver attended a press conference to talk about the film. Check some videos below, plus some of his answer at the press conference by The Upcoming.

The Nice Guys UK Press Part 1
The Nice Guys UK Press Part 2
The Hollywood News
The Upcoming
Flick and the City Plus

Matt, John Boy is terrifying without saying anything, just in his demeanour. Was that great to bring to life?
Matt Bomer: Oh yeah, I mean it is always fun to paint with different colours and play these kind of roles you aren’t typically thin-sliced as, and to do it with these people. I am essentially a fan boy who is lucky to be along for the ride. Shane and Joel are a huge part of my cinematic upbringing: to watch two of my favourite actors create this incredible symbiotic comedic performance where one doesn’t work without the other and every take is different, it was just an incredible education for me.

RC: I could have made it work without Ryan (laughter).

We have been talking about the actors, what was it like, Matt, to throw a 13 year old girl through a window?
MB: Angorie is such a consummate professional that, you know, it was the first thing I filmed and I had to throw a young girl through a window and I immediately felt the need to ingratiate myself to these young girls, and that I was a parent and it was just pretend and they just stared at me blankly and were like, so? Throw me through the window, what you got? That’s it? I want another take! So yeah, they took me to school.