Categories Anything

‘Anything’ takes top prizes at FilmOut’s San Diego LGBT Film Festival 2018

‘Anything’ takes top prizes at FilmOut’s San Diego LGBT Film Festival 2018

This year was the 20th Anniversary of the San Diego LGBT Film Festival and Anything was among the nominated movies. There was some controversy surrounding the movie but despite the backlash, it took home a whopping seven festival awards including Best Feature, John Carroll Lynch as Best Actor, Matt Bomer as Best Supporting Actor and Timothy McNeil as Best Director.

You can find a full list of the winners here. Check in our gallery two brand new images of Matt as Freda.

Categories Anything

(Watch) ‘Anything’ trailer

(Watch) ‘Anything’ trailer

The trailer for Anything was released this week! Based on McNeil’s 2007 play of the same name, the film casts John Carroll Lynch as Early, a heartbroken widower who attempts to get his life back together after the sudden death of his wife. That includes a move to Hollywood, where he meets charming next door neighbor Freda (Bomer), tentatively embarking on a relationship with the trans sex worker that few other people in his life understand.

“Anything” opens in New York in May 11 and Los Angeles and other markets on May 18.

Categories Walking Out

‘Walking Out’ DVD Screen Captures

‘Walking Out’ DVD Screen Captures

Walking Out was released on DVD last February 6th – and its also available in digital video on demand.

Screen captures has now added in our gallery. I’ve got the domain back when was released on digital video, but decided to wait until the DVD was released so everyone could see it. It’s really beautiful. Enjoy!

Categories Papi Chulo

Matt Bomer Joins John Butler’s ‘Papi Chulo’

Matt Bomer Joins John Butler’s ‘Papi Chulo’

Matt Bomer started filming this month Papi Chulo, the new film from Handsome Devil director John Butler.Papi Chulo, the new film from Handsome Devil director John Butler. He will star alongside Alejandro Patiño (The Runaways) in the black comedy about a lonely TV weatherman who strikes up an unusual friendship with a middle-aged Latino migrant worker (The Hollywood Reporter).

Some images has been shared on Instagram and Twitter, and I have added them to our gallery. Check it:

Categories Video Walking Out

(Video) Matt Talks ‘Gold Derby’ about Walking Out

(Video) Matt Talks ‘Gold Derby’ about Walking Out

GOLD DERBY – Matt Bomer is best known for playing big-city characters in projects like “White Collar,” “The Normal Heart,” and “The Last Tycoon,” so his role in the independent film “Walking Out” as a gruff Montana hunter trying to bond with his teenage son (Josh Wiggins), seems like a departure. But it actually hits much closer to home. “I grew up in a house full of outdoorsmen and that type of male bonding exhibited in the film,” Bomer says in our exclusive video interview (watch above). “That type of outdoorsmanship and male bonding through quiet and unspoken connection, not really sure how to connect, was something I understood from my childhood, and I thought they were able to tap into it in a really profound way.”

The characters in the film brave the elements and endure hardships in the wilderness, and to an extent so did the actors. “This was not the type of set wear we were going to be coddled in any way,” Bomer explained. “There were no trailers, there were no cast chairs, there were no apple boxes. You stood in the snow between takes and got ready for the next scene, and I wouldn’t have had it any other way to be honest with you.”

Not only are Bomer and his on-screen son alone in wild, they’re also the only actors on screen for much of the film, which provided them the opportunity to “bond and create a relationship and … get to know each other in a way that sometimes you don’t get to with other co-stars.” Commenting on Wiggins’s performance, Bomer says, “He’s a superstar … He has this great thing that you can’t really teach: he’s so intuitive, and he has a great lack of self-awareness and a lack of vanity that you need, but it’s hard to find in younger actors.”

“Walking Out” premiered in January at the Sundance Film Festival, and IFC Films released it on October 6 to strong reviews. Do you think it could be a dark horse awards contender this season?

Categories Interviews Walking Out

Matt Bomer on Man Against Nature in Walking Out and His New Job

Matt Bomer on Man Against Nature in Walking Out and His New Job

Parade magazine has published a new interview with Matt, in order of the Walking Out release today.

Read it below, and also check additional stills and posters from the movie in our gallery.

With your background, how did you prepare for this man-against-nature role?

I love the outdoors and I love Montana, so I went up early with Alex Smith, one of the twin brother directors of the film, and we did some outdoor activities with some real Montanans. People who were living the life or a reasonable facsimile of the life that Cal lived. So we fished, I went on a hunting trip with them and we talked. I tried to get inside their heads a little bit.

Other than that, it was really an experiential shoot. This was something that everyone did for the love of the piece. There were no trailers; there were no cast chairs. You came in, you got ready, and you stood in the snow on the mountain in Montana in between takes while the snow fell.

What was it like to work in all that snow?

I really liked it. I was really grateful that I was healthy. I didn’t want to get sick on such a short shoot but we had great set costumers taking care of us with heating pads strapped to our bodies when it got really cold. The rest of the time, you wanted it to be in that immersive experience. You want to be that cold. It is one less thing you have to think about as an actor in a scene where the character is experiencing a similar circumstance.

The activity in the film is this father/son hunting trip, so it seems to be more about forging a father/son bond or maybe connecting in general, putting down your phone and having human connections than actually hunting.

Yes, it is absolutely about connections. Both the characters in the film have preconceived notions of how they are going to connect. David is more reticent about it but Cal really feels that he has to instill these values and principles in his son; he has to pass them on. What they realize during the course of the film is that a lot of real bonding happens under the most dire circumstances. When everything you presuppose and everything you try to project on an event goes out the window, you really are left with your most raw self.

As a father of three, what did you take away from this particular relationship between father and son?

I drew from my father a lot for this in an interesting way, particularly because our sons are a bit younger than David’s character in the film. So a lot of it was what I drew from my relationship from my father. I think what I took from it was Josh Wiggins is one of my favorite people I have ever worked with. We had a blast together.

My favorite nature scene is when the deer comes up to Cal. That really got me.

That was just one of those magic moments that you pray for and you hope that the gods come through. We were out on this property and they said, “We have this tame deer. She is very curious. She may or may not come up to you.” So, I had to sit at the bottom of this tree while they rolled the cameras and hope that this deer would approach me. For whatever reason, miraculously, she did. That was the take we got. It was a really spiritual experience. It was towards the end of the shoot and I had a pretty good experience of what my character was and you hope that you can avail yourself in that moment.

It was sad that The Last Tycoon was canceled but it actually ended in a good place.

It had always been a dream to do a [F. Scott] Fitzgerald piece and the fact that I got to do it with a bucket list of professionals that I always wanted to work with across the board — behind the camera and in front of the camera; above the line, below the line — so I am incredibly grateful for that experience. The fact that we had nine hours of Fitzgerald, how many people can say that they did that?

How have you been preparing for your directorial debut?

I am in my directing office right now and I am going to start tomorrow. I poured over thousands of pages of books, I shadowed some really talented, generous, wonderful directors, and I am in the world of Ryan Murphy, so you have some of the most incredible professionals you could have working with you. I am excited and terrified and I haven’t really been this thrilled about anything in this industry for awhile, so it’s been a great way to shake up my creative spirit.

I’ve heard that Ryan is good about giving opportunities to first-time directors. How did it come about that this was yours?

He is just one of those people who is so generous of spirit. Truly. I think he knew I had been in this medium of episodic for 20 years, and he knew that I really extensively prepare for everything that I do, and for whatever reason, he saw qualities in me that he felt would work well as an episodic director.

He called me out of the blue and said, “What do you think about directing it?” I was flabbergasted and blown away and I just very humbly said, “I can’t thank you enough. I will do my best to be prepared and come through. Obviously, he’s been a very big influence in my life and, in large part, he’s been an architect of my career in many ways.

What about the murder of Gianni Versace will make people want to watch?

There is so much I didn’t know. There are so many reasons people are going to watch. There are so many incredible performances going on and the writing is unparalleled. But there is so much about the story that I didn’t understand the specifics of it in the larger context of what was going on in the time period. I am excited for people to see it.

It also has sex, money and fashion.

All the things that excites and titillates but it also has some real substance and nuance to it that will keep people coming back for more.

Categories Walking Out

Matt Bomer shines in ‘Walking Out’, out now on theaters and VOD

Matt Bomer shines in ‘Walking Out’, out now on theaters and VOD

Walking Out open in theaters today – and also can be found on iTunes for those fortunate living in the right place.

Reviews are being great so far (the film is getting 89% fresh on Rotten Tomattoes), specially coming to Matt Bomer’s heartbreaking performance.

The fact that Bomer is only 39 and still in shape from “Magic Mike XXL” only serves to underline the extent to which myth has shaped his idea of masculinity. It also makes him seem a little crazy. Fortunately, the actor plays against his pretty boy type so convincingly that you might forget where you’ve even seen him before. He has the far-off look in his eyes of a guy who resented his pop right up to the moment where he fell in love with the romance of becoming him. Bomer gives a commanding performance in a movie that fails to realize how evocative he is, the Smiths defaulting to flashbacks that show us less about cowboys and gender codes than we can glean from the wild look in its lead actor’s face. – Indiewire

Such a lack of easy-read intentions regarding the Smiths’ into-the-wild excursion tends to feel more like a complexity feature than an incoherence bug, however, and certainly doesn’t take away from Bomer’s prickly-to-proud performance or Wiggins ability to let you see this boy slowly turn into a man. – Rolling Stone

Bomer and Wiggins’s committed performances and the screenplay’s granular depiction of its skilled outdoorsman struggling against the elements that he’s typically able to handle bring an emotional richness to an otherwise simple, barebones story. – Slant

Make sure to support the movie. If you’re unable to watch the movie on IFC Center in New York, find here ways to watch it.

Categories Films

‘The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning’ Screencaptures

‘The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning’ Screencaptures

Today I’ve worked in replacing the previous DVD sized to HD sized screen captures of Matt scenes in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning. I remember being so happy when saw Matt appearing on the hotel scene – I already knew him from Tru Calling, and didn’t know he was part of this movie until that scene – and instantly being upset because I knew this movie would be painful to watch. Indeed, ‘leave him alone’ was part of my whole experience watching this… I’m sure that happened with a lot of you guys.

Enjoy the captures!